Around Town: August 1 – 7, 2016

Friends of Jonesborough,
Beat the heat with Scoop Fest this coming Saturday, enjoy over 30 flavors of ice cream throughout downtown businesses. After consuming all those calories, lace up your sneakers and join DCHS for the 2nd Annual Pioneer Pride 5K! Lots more also planned for the week, so we hope to see you on Main Street!
scoop

Monday,
August 1
  • Historic Downtown Walking Tour
    1 – 2 pm Starts at the Chester Inn Museum
    $5 Admission Call 423.753.9580 for more info

Tuesday,
August 2
  • Teller In Residence – Noa Baum
    2 pm atInternational Storytelling Center
    Admission requiredClick HEREfor more info
  • Tuesday Night at the Movies
    5:30 – 7:00 pm More info 423.753.1800
    Free event sponsored by the Friends of the Library
  • Public Meeting about Jonesborough’s Community Development Block Grant Application for Facade Improvements
    6 pm at ISC Community and Businesses encouraged to attend
    Call 423.753.1030 for more info
  • Jonesborough Storytellers Guild
    7 – 8:30 pm at the International Storytelling Center
    Admission Required Click HEREfor more information

Wednesday,
August 3
  • Historic Downtown Walking Tour
    1 – 2 pm Starts at the Chester Inn Museum
    $5 Admission Call 423.753.9580 for more info
  • Teller In Residence – Noa Baum
    2 pm atInternational Storytelling Center
    Admission requiredClickHEREfor more info

Thursday,
August 4
  • Teller In Residence – Noa Baum
    2 pm atInternational Storytelling Center
    Admission requiredClickHEREfor more info
    Call 423.913.1343 for more info
  • Historic Downtown Walking Tour
    7– 8 pm Starts at the Chester Inn Museum
    $5 Admission Call 423.753.9580 for more info

Friday,
August 5
  • Historic Downtown Walking Tour
    1 – 2 pm Starts at the Chester Inn Museum
    $5 Admission Call 423.753.9580 for more info
  • Teller In Residence – Noa Baum
    2 pm atInternational Storytelling Center
    Admission requiredClickHEREfor more info
  • Music on the Square – bring your chairs in front of the courthouse
    7 pm in front of the courthouse
    Click HERE for more info

Saturday,
August 6
  • Jonesborough Farmers Market
    8 am – noon on Courthouse Square
    ClickHEREfor more info
  • Salvage Warehouse Open
    8 – 11 am at 600 Depot Street
    Call 753-9580 for more info
  • Historic Downtown Walking Tour
    1 – 2 pm Starts at the Chester Inn Museum
    $5 Admission Call 423.753.9580 for more info
  • Teller In Residence – Noa Baum
    2 pm atInternational Storytelling Center
    Admission requiredClickHEREfor more info
  • Scoop Fest
    4 – 8 pm Downtown Jonesborough
    Admission required. Purchase tickets HERE
  • Artist Opening Reception – Beverly Jenkins & Jeff Mullins
    6 – 8 pm at the McKinney Center
    Part of the Mary B. Martin Program for the Arts
  • Movies on Main – Minions
    8 – 10 pm at 125 E Main St – The Lollipop Shop
    Bring your own chairs
  • Pioneer Pride 5K Run
    8 – 10:30 pm Run begins at Crockett and ends at Courthouse
    Block party and music after the race Sign up HERE

 

Sunday,
August 7
  • Main Street Brews & Tunes
    3 – 5 pm on the Plaza at the Storytelling Center
    Click HEREfor more infoscoop

Butterfly Watching Session at Ardinna Woods

Naturalist Larry McDaniel will lead a butterfly watching and identification session at Ardinna Woods Arboretum and its Butterfly Garden, Sunday, July 17, 2:00 to 3:30 PM.  The event is free and open to the public.  Interested participants are invited to come at any time during this period.

The arboretum is located at Highway 81 South and Britt Drive, Jonesborough, 0.9 miles from the downtown Courthouse in direction toward Erwin.  For more information call 753-5288.

statebuterflysm

Washington County receives state grant for industrial park

Washington County was presented with a check for $473,405 from the state of Tennessee to be used to continue to prepare their industrial park. There were 72 sites that were eligible inside of the state, with 24 applying. Of those 24, 15 sites were selected after a presentation was given.

 

For more information, check the July 13 edition of the Herald & Tribune.

 

Alicia Summers, Business Development Director at the Washington County Economic Development Council; Commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development Randy Boyd; Washington County Mayor Dan Eldridge; Tommy Burleson; Mitch Miller, CEO of the Washington County Economic Development Council

Alicia Summers, Business Development Director at the Washington County Economic Development Council; Commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development Randy Boyd; Washington County Mayor Dan Eldridge; Tommy Burleson; Mitch Miller, CEO of the Washington County Economic Development Council.

Commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development Randy Boyd presented Washington County with a check for $473,405 to go towards Washington County's industrial Park.

Commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development Randy Boyd presented Washington County with a check for $473,405 to go towards Washington County’s industrial Park.

Tommy Burleson spoke during the presentation.

Tommy Burleson spoke during the presentation.

Washington County Mayor Dan Eldridge gave his thoughts during the check presentation.

Washington County Mayor Dan Eldridge gave his thoughts during the check presentation.

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46th Annual Jonesborough Days Festival June 30 through July 2

fireworks

Historic Jonesborough, Tennessee’s Oldest Town, will celebrate the 46th annual Jonesborough Days Festival on June 30 through July 2 with family activities, regional music, parade, fireworks and storytelling.

 The 2016 Jonesborough Days Festival will begin Thursday, June 30 at 5 p.m. and continue through Saturday July 2 at 10 p.m. The annual fireworks show will take place on Friday, July 1 at 10 p.m. and the parade will take place on Saturday, July 2 at 10 a.m.

 Thursday’s activities include the popular Food City Low County Shrimp Boil at the International Storytelling Center from 5 to 7 p.m.  Tickets are $12 and can be purchased at the Jonesborough Visitors Center or International Storytelling Center.

Festival hours include Thursday, June 30 from 5 to 10 p.m., Friday, July 1 from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Saturday, July 2 from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.  Admission to the festival is free and open to the public.

 The festival has been voted as one of the top events in the southeast and is known for its community patriotism and nostalgic atmosphere. Various entertainment and activities will take place throughout the historic district on all three days. Doc’s Front Porch sponsored by Ferguson Enterprises will feature a variety of storytellers and musicians on the plaza at the International Storytelling Center.  The Main Stage will also feature entertainment each evening from 6 to 10 p.m. including The Beach Nite Band on Thursday, White Top Mountain Band and Blue Foxx on Friday and Jackdaw’s 7 and Amythyst Kiah on Saturday.  The festival will also host nearly 70 vendors, showcasing local handmade wares and a variety of marketplace items available. And of course, there will be some great festival food vendors serving a variety of foods from BBQ to funnel cakes.

 A new attraction for children and families this year will be the First Tennessee Foundation #OnlyInJonesborough Discovery Park located behind the Storytelling Center. There you will find lots of hands-on ways to experience activities only found in Jonesborough including McKinney Center art and performance classes, Oak Hill School sessions, period games from the Heritage Alliance and more. Visit Discovery Park on Friday and Saturday from noon to 8 p.m. and see what all Jonesborough has to discover.

 The Tri-State Antique Power Association will have a variety of vintage tractors and equipment on display downtown.  The eating contests will also return beginning with the Pepper Eating Contest on Friday at 5 p.m., the Olde Town Pancake Eating Contest on Saturday following the parade and the newest addition includes the Bull Dog Hot Dog Eating Contest on Saturday at 5 p.m.

parade

The Jonesborough Repertory Theatre will also present its ever-popular 1940s USO Show with performances scheduled all weekend. And the Saratoga Social Connection will give folks a chance to relax, recharge their devices with free Wi-Fi and connect to Jonesborough’s social media accounts.

  Parking and shuttles are available at the Jonesborough Middle School for $5 per car. For a complete event schedule or for more information on the 46th Annual Jonesborough Days Festival, call 423.753.1010 or visit Jonesborough Days on Facebook.

Donna Cox Briggs hired as new Washington County Archive Assistant as work is completed on building

Donna Cox Briggs, left, has been hired as a Washington County Archive Assistant. She, along with Ned Irwin, right, will be given the task of keeping up with the county’s history inside of the newly remodeled office on Main Street in Jonesborough.

Donna Cox Briggs, left, has been hired as a Washington County Archive Assistant. She, along with Ned Irwin, right, will be given the task of keeping up with the county’s history inside of the newly remodeled office on Main Street in Jonesborough.

By JOHN KIENER

Assocaite Editor

 jkiener@heraldandtribune.com

Work on the Washington County Archive is complete except for adjustments to the air conditioning system, according to Washington County Archivist  Ned Irwin.  Irwin also announced during a meeting of the Friends of the Archives in June that Donna Cox Briggs has been hired as an archive assistant. She begins work in July.

A native of the Colonial Heights area of Sullivan County, Mrs. Briggs has an extensive background in genealogical work.  She helped form the Cemetery Survey Team of Northeast Tennessee about 15 years ago.  The team has photographed and transcribed more than 800 cemeteries in the area. As a researcher, Briggs has helped people trace their lineage for the Sons of the American Revolution (SAR), Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR), and Society of Confederate Veterans (SCV).

The new assistant has served in several capacities as a member of the Watauga Association of Genealogists, and is the current secretary of the Washington County Historical Association and the Washington County, Tennessee Friends of the Archives.

The newly remodeled building is located on Main Street in Jonesborough.

The newly remodeled building is located on Main Street in Jonesborough.

Because her position is part-time, Briggs will be able to continue working on several genealogical projects, including photographing and transcribing the cemeteries of the Sullivan and Washington Counties, in addition to transcribing the Quarterly Court Minutes of Washington and Carter Counties. Briggs is a regular contributor to the Watauga Association of Genealogists Bulletin.

Briggs and her husband Mike have been together for 39 years.  They live in Colonial Heights and are the parents of two children and have three grandchildren.  Her background includes working for an environmental company that handles hazardous spills and debris removal from disaster situations.  She spent time working in the Gulf during the BP oil spill. She has been retired from the environmental company for five years.

Irwin said in his speech to the Friends of the Archives that it will require a minimum of two people to operate the Washington County Archive once it is opened.  One individual will supervise the reading room where tables and chairs are available to researchers, while the other staff member will then be available to retrieve material from the archive shelving. Volunteers will help supplement archive staffing.

The next step in preparing the archive for an opening to the public will involve the transfer of county records from various offices and arranging for access the same on two floors of the building which formerly housed county offices such as that of the county mayor and bookkeeping department.  “We have more than 5,000 linear feet of shelving,” Irwin said in his recent speech.  “The shelving is adjustable so that different size materials can be properly stored.”

Irwin expects county records currently being stored at the Archives of Appalachia on the campus of East Tennessee State University to be some of the initial materials transferred to the county archive. The ETSU records date from the county’s early history in the 1770s until the 1930s.

“They are mostly loose court records,” Irwin said. He added, “In addition to their use for genealogists, these records have already been used for research papers and in dissertations at the university.”

Established in 2011, the Washington County Records Management and Archives Department cares for the public records of Washington County, established in 1777.  As the state’s original county, Washington County holds Tennessee’s oldest records.  Irwin said, “It is the purpose of the department to assist officials in the preservation of these records and to assist researchers in accessing them.” The material once transferred to the archive will be stored in a sequence copying the manner in which county officials originally organized their records.

In carrying out this purpose, Irwin provided the Herald & Tribune with the current fiscal year’s statistics.  He said that there are 243 shelving units in the newly completed archive or 1,701 archival storage shelves. This equals 5,103 linear feet – nearly one mile of shelving or about the length of 17 football fields. The archive also has acquired map cabinets and shelving that will accommodate oversize documents.

As the sole archive employee before the hiring of  Briggs, Irwin handled 457 reference inquiries through June 6. The inquiries came from 34 states.  Recent arrivals of materials at the county archive include desks and tables for use by the public.  A computer link is also being provided to the Register of Deeds office, so that researchers can search and copy records from the office without going to the Main Street Court House.  Irwin said that “the deeds for Washington County have been scanned, are online, and indexed, so that no additional indexing of these records will be required by archive personnel.”

Besides the computer terminal used to research deeds, there will be a printer so that people using the terminal can obtain a copy of land records discovered in their research.

People who enter the reading room of the archive will be allowed to bring their laptop computers to record information. Wifi will be available. The staff will also be available to make photocopies of records.  Rules and charges for using and photocopying records have been established by the County Public Records Commission. These guidelines will govern the use of the archive.  Members of the public will not be allowed to visit the stacks themselves or the Archive Annex.

Hours during which the archive will be open have not been established.

“Volunteers will be very important,” Irwin said, stressing that the number of volunteers will determine to some extent the hours that the public can use the facility.

The Friends of the Archives currently has 16 members, many of whom are volunteer archive workers.  When the facility opens to the public, Irwin hopes that additional volunteers will be recruited. He can be contacted by phone at 753-0393 or by email at nirwin@washingtoncountytn.org if individuals are interested in volunteering at the facility.  People can also contact Friends President Betty Jane Hylton at bjhylton@comcast.net.

Current acquisition rules for the archive indicate that only public records will be stored.  While this excludes private records, non-public materials are being accepted at the Washington County-Jonesborough Library.

Irwin says that there will be cooperative efforts between the Jonesborough Library and his office as well as sharing volunteers and efforts with the Heritage Alliance.  The Chester Inn owned by the State of Tennessee and operated by the Alliance is located directly across the street from the County Archive.

A sampling of the records being transferred to archive shelves include court records from Chancery, Circuit, Criminal and Sessions Courts along with Magistrates (Justice of the Peace) dockets, election, education records, tax assessment materials, marriage records, and county court minutes, among others.

“Modern records will not be placed in the archive building,” Irwin said. The cutoff date for considering records “modern” is approximately 1950 but will vary somewhat by office and record type.  Materials acquired after that date are being stored in the Archive Annex located in the space formerly occupied by the county jail.

The archivist expects to find historic papers tracing significant events in Washington County and in the formation of the State of Tennessee as records are indexed and used for research.  For example, Irwin has already identified papers from the State of Franklin era.

Looking forward to an archive opening in the future, Irwin is excited.  He said that when the opening takes place, “You will have facilities available for historic research and museums within walking distance.  There will also be places to eat. You will never have to leave downtown Jonesborough during the day.”

Work on the Washington County Archive is complete except for adjustments to the air conditioning system, according to Washington County Archivist  Ned Irwin.  Irwin also announced during a meeting of the Friends of the Archives in June that Donna Cox Briggs has been hired as an archive assistant. She begins work in July.

A native of the Colonial Heights area of Sullivan County, Mrs. Briggs has an extensive background in genealogical work.  She helped form the Cemetery Survey Team of Northeast Tennessee about 15 years ago.  The team has photographed and transcribed more than 800 cemeteries in the area. As a researcher, Briggs has helped people trace their lineage for the Sons of the American Revolution (SAR), Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR), and Society of Confederate Veterans (SCV).

The new assistant has served in several capacities as a member of the Watauga Association of Genealogists, and is the current secretary of the Washington County Historical Association and the Washington County, Tennessee Friends of the Archives.

Because her position is part-time, Briggs will be able to continue working on several genealogical projects, including photographing and transcribing the cemeteries of the Sullivan and Washington Counties, in addition to transcribing the Quarterly Court Minutes of Washington and Carter Counties. Briggs is a regular contributor to the Watauga Association of Genealogists Bulletin.

Briggs and her husband Mike have been together for 39 years.  They live in Colonial Heights and are the parents of two children and have three grandchildren.  Her background includes working for an environmental company that handles hazardous spills and debris removal from disaster situations.  She spent time working in the Gulf during the BP oil spill. She has been retired from the environmental company for five years.

Irwin said in his speech to the Friends of the Archives that it will require a minimum of two people to operate the Washington County Archive once it is opened.  One individual will supervise the reading room where tables and chairs are available to researchers, while the other staff member will then be available to retrieve material from the archive shelving. Volunteers will help supplement archive staffing.

The next step in preparing the archive for an opening to the public will involve the transfer of county records from various offices and arranging for access the same on two floors of the building which formerly housed county offices such as that of the county mayor and bookkeeping department.  “We have more than 5,000 linear feet of shelving,” Irwin said in his recent speech.  “The shelving is adjustable so that different size materials can be properly stored.”

Irwin expects county records currently being stored at the Archives of Appalachia on the campus of East Tennessee State University to be some of the initial materials transferred to the county archive. The ETSU records date from the county’s early history in the 1770s until the 1930s.

“They are mostly loose court records,” Irwin said. He added, “In addition to their use for genealogists, these records have already been used for research papers and in dissertations at the university.”

Established in 2011, the Washington County Records Management and Archives Department cares for the public records of Washington County, established in 1777.  As the state’s original county, Washington County holds Tennessee’s oldest records.  Irwin said, “It is the purpose of the department to assist officials in the preservation of these records and to assist researchers in accessing them.” The material once transferred to the archive will be stored in a sequence copying the manner in which county officials originally organized their records.

In carrying out this purpose, Irwin provided the Herald & Tribune with the current fiscal year’s statistics.  He said that there are 243 shelving units in the newly completed archive or 1,701 archival storage shelves. This equals 5,103 linear feet – nearly one mile of shelving or about the length of 17 football fields. The archive also has acquired map cabinets and shelving that will accommodate oversize documents.

As the sole archive employee before the hiring of  Briggs, Irwin handled 457 reference inquiries through June 6. The inquiries came from 34 states.  Recent arrivals of materials at the county archive include desks and tables for use by the public.  A computer link is also being provided to the Register of Deeds office, so that researchers can search and copy records from the office without going to the Main Street Court House.  Irwin said that “the deeds for Washington County have been scanned, are online, and indexed, so that no additional indexing of these records will be required by archive personnel.”

Besides the computer terminal used to research deeds, there will be a printer so that people using the terminal can obtain a copy of land records discovered in their research.

People who enter the reading room of the archive will be allowed to bring their laptop computers to record information. Wifi will be available. The staff will also be available to make photocopies of records.  Rules and charges for using and photocopying records have been established by the County Public Records Commission. These guidelines will govern the use of the archive.  Members of the public will not be allowed to visit the stacks themselves or the Archive Annex.

Hours during which the archive will be open have not been established.

“Volunteers will be very important,” Irwin said, stressing that the number of volunteers will determine to some extent the hours that the public can use the facility.

The Friends of the Archives currently has 16 members, many of whom are volunteer archive workers.  When the facility opens to the public, Irwin hopes that additional volunteers will be recruited. He can be contacted by phone at 753-0393 or by email at nirwin@washingtoncountytn.org if individuals are interested in volunteering at the facility.  People can also contact Friends President Betty Jane Hylton at bjhylton@comcast.net.

Current acquisition rules for the archive indicate that only public records will be stored.  While this excludes private records, non-public materials are being accepted at the Washington County-Jonesborough Library.

Irwin says that there will be cooperative efforts between the Jonesborough Library and his office as well as sharing volunteers and efforts with the Heritage Alliance.  The Chester Inn owned by the State of Tennessee and operated by the Alliance is located directly across the street from the County Archive.

A sampling of the records being transferred to archive shelves include court records from Chancery, Circuit, Criminal and Sessions Courts along with Magistrates (Justice of the Peace) dockets, election, education records, tax assessment materials, marriage records, and county court minutes, among others.

“Modern records will not be placed in the archive building,” Irwin said. The cutoff date for considering records “modern” is approximately 1950 but will vary somewhat by office and record type.  Materials acquired after that date are being stored in the Archive Annex located in the space formerly occupied by the county jail.

The archivist expects to find historic papers tracing significant events in Washington County and in the formation of the State of Tennessee as records are indexed and used for research.  For example, Irwin has already identified papers from the State of Franklin era.

Looking forward to an archive opening in the future, Irwin is excited.  He said that when the opening takes place, “You will have facilities available for historic research and museums within walking distance.  There will also be places to eat. You will never have to leave downtown Jonesborough during the day.”

This week in downtown Jonesborough (June 20-June 26)

onlyinJSBORO

CONTRIBUTED

 

Friends of Jonesborough,
Hope everyone is enjoying our beautiful summer weather. If the heat is bothering you just remember back in January and February when we were all saying, “I can’t wait for warmer weather!” There are many fun activities this week so be sure and mark your calendars with the dates of events that you do not want to miss! 
Have fun and see you on Main Street soon!

Monday,
June 20
  • Historic Downtown Walking Tour
    1 – 2 pm Starts at the Chester Inn Museum
    $5 Admission Call 423.753.9580 for more info

 


Tuesday,
June 21
  • Teller In Residence – Rev. Robert Jones
    2 pm atInternational Storytelling Center
    Admission requiredClick HEREfor more info
  • Jonesborough Storytellers Guild
    7 – 8:30 pm at the International Storytelling Center
    Admission Required Click HEREfor more information

 


Wednesday,
June 22
  • Historic Downtown Walking Tour
    1 – 2 pm Starts at the Chester Inn Museum
    $5 Admission Call 423.753.9580 for more info
  • Teller In Residence – Rev. Robert Jones
    2 pm atInternational Storytelling Center
    Admission requiredClickHEREfor more info
  • On The Air Jonesborough Yarn Exchange Broadcast
    8 – 9 pm WETS – FM 89.5
    Click HEREto listen

Thursday,
June 23
  • Teller In Residence – Rev. Robert Jones
    2 pm and 7:30 pm atInternational Storytelling Center
    Admission requiredClickHEREfor more info
    Call for more info: 423.913.1343
  • Main Street Mingle
    5:30 – 6:30 pm at The Dining Room
    All are welcome!

Friday,
June 24
  • Historic Downtown Walking Tour
    1 – 2 pm Starts at the Chester Inn Museum
    $5 Admission Call 423.753.9580 for more info
  • Quilt Show – Mountain Messages
    10 am – 5 pm at the McKinney Center
    Free – For more info call 423.753.0562
  • Teller In Residence – Rev. Robert Jones
    2 pm atInternational Storytelling Center
    Admission requiredClickHEREfor more info
  • Music on the Square – bring your chairs in front of the courthouse
    7 pm in front of the courthouse
    Click HERE for more info
  • JRT presents The USO SHow
    7:30 – 9 pm at the Jonesborough Repertory Theatre
    Admission required. Purchase tickets HERE 

Saturday,
June 25
  • Jonesborough Farmers Market
    8 am – noon on Courthouse Square
    ClickHEREfor more info
  • Quilt Show – Mountain Messages
    10 am – 5 pm at the McKinney Center
    Free – For more info call 423.753.0562
  • Faces of Main Street Fashion Event
    11 am – noon at 123 East Main St. – Type A Designs
    For more info call 423.483.9708
  • Historic Downtown Walking Tour
    1 – 2 pm Starts at the Chester Inn Museum
    $5 Admission Call 423.753.9580 for more info
  • Teller In Residence – Rev. Robert Jones
    2 pm atInternational Storytelling Center
    Admission requiredClickHEREfor more info
  • JRT presents USO Show
    2 pm and 7:30 pm
    Admission required. Purchase tickets HERE
  • Movies on Main
    8 – 10 pm at 125 E Main St – The Lollipop Shop
    Bring your own chairs – Shaun The Sheep

 

Sunday,
June 26
  • JRT presents USO Show
    2 pm at the Jonesborough Repertory Theatre
    Admission required. Purchase ticketsHERE
    Main Street Brews & Tunes
    3 – 5 pm Beer and Music
    More info: HERE
  • Wetlands Water Park Praise by the Pool Night
    6 – 9 pm at Persimmon Ridge Park
    $3 admission More info HERE